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<h6>Reading</h6>
 
<h6>Reading</h6>
 
Texts will be made available via Moodle and the EF library.
 
Texts will be made available via Moodle and the EF library.
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Suggestions for introductory reading:
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*Jennifer M. Gidley: ''The Future: A Very Short Introduction.'' Oxford UP, 2017.
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*John Storey: ''Radical Utopianism and Cultural Studies: On Refusing to be Realistic.''[https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/9781315201580] Routledge, 2019.
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<h6>Requirements</h6>
 
<h6>Requirements</h6>

Aktuelle Version vom 13. Februar 2020, 11:26 Uhr

Summer Semester 2020

  • no current announcements

Course Information
Nr. Kursbezeichnung Typ Zeit Raum DozentIn
154523 Britain's Futures 2 HS Mi 16:00 - 17:30 R. 3.306 Schmitt
Course Description

In After the Future (2011), Franco Berardi argues that western capitalist societies have been experiencing a “slow cancellation of the future” since the 1970s and 80s (18). While the future used to hold the promise of progress and change throughout the 20th century, we now live in “the century with no future” (ibid.). This was anticipated by late 20th-century forms of cultural expression such as British punk, and characterised by a profound sense of temporal fractation and an anxiety with regard to what might come after the present. A number of recent publications by British cultural critics similarly engage with shifting notions of temporality and the future in the neoliberal era: in Capitalist Realism (2009), Mark Fisher asks if there really is “no alternative” to the all-embracing capitalist system. These statements suggest that time is profoundly unsettled, and that ideas of progress have given way to stasis and decline.
But has it always been this way? A concept of the future and of cultural, social and political progress is as important for a national culture and its conception of history as having an idea of the past. In this seminar, we will trace different conceptions of Britain’s future throughout the nation’s cultural history, ranging from Thomas More’s Utopia (1516) to William Morris’ News from Nowhere (1890) and to Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams’ Inventing the Future (2015). We will analyse the discourses and historical contexts of dominant mainstream conceptions of the future as well as of alternative conceptions of the future of marginalised cultural groups such as the Afro-Futurists.

Reading

Texts will be made available via Moodle and the EF library.

Suggestions for introductory reading:

  • Jennifer M. Gidley: The Future: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford UP, 2017.
  • John Storey: Radical Utopianism and Cultural Studies: On Refusing to be Realistic.[1] Routledge, 2019.


Requirements

Regular attendance, participation in an expert group plus additional assignments depending on your course of studies.

Modules
Modulzuordnungen
Lehramtsstudiengänge
LABG G: HRG/HRSGe GyGe/BK SP
2009 703, 704 601, 1001 601, 701, 702, 1001 703
2016 601, 703, 704 601, 1001 601, 701, 702, 1001 703
Angewandte Sprachwissenschaften/Angewandte Literatur-/Kulturwissenschaften:
B.A.ALK: B.A.AS: M.A.ALK: M.A.AS:
PO vor WS 16/17:
  • Kern: 6abc, 7c
  • Komp: 3abc, 4a
  • Kern: 6bc
  • Komp: 4a
1abc, 3bc 2ab
PO ab WS 16/17:
  • Kern: 6abc, 7c
  • Komp: 3abcd, 4a
  • Kern: 6bc
  • Komp: 4a
1abcd, 3bc 2ab